Trauma-Informed Practice

“The brain-disease model overlooks four fundamental truths: (1) our capacity to destroy one another is matched by our capacity to heal one another. Restoring relationships and community is central to restoring well-being; (2) language gives us the power to change ourselves and others by communicating our experiences, helping us to define what we know, and finding a common sense of meaning; (3) we have the ability to regulate our own physiology, including some of the so-called involuntary functions of the body and brain, through such basic activities as breathing, moving, and touching; and (4) we can change social conditions to create environments in which children and adults can feel safe and where they can thrive.”
โ€” Bessel A. van der Kolk (The Body Keeps the Score: Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma)

Emotional Intelligence and Leadership Responsibility

Emotional intelligence (EI) as defined by Brackett, Rivers & Salovey (2011) is “a set of mental abilities involving emotion-based problem solving” (p. 99). The four abilities are 1) perception of emotion, 2) using emotion to facilitate thinking, 3) understanding and analyzing emotions and 4) reflective regulation of emotions. Research of EI in education and leadership indicates awareness and coordination of emotions can contribute to a higher performing, more supportive learning and working environment (Bracket, et al., 2011; McCleskey, 2014; Ordun & Acar, 2014).

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